Fallen Bikers Memorial Page

Fallen Bikers Memorial Page

Support group and forum for fallen bikers and their friends and families.

 
geodiagosta and 3 others have joined the group Fallen Bikers Memorial Page 7 months ago
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webmaster has liked a Discussion 11 months ago
webmaster posted a new discussion11 months ago

Dead Biker Buried Riding Harley in Giant Transparent Casket

Years before Billy Standley died on Sunday, he planned out every detail of his funeral: He bought up the three plots next to his wife's grave, had his sons build him a custom casket, and arranged for the funeral director to embalm him in a sitting position. Earlier today, Standley's dream funeral took place, and he was laid to rest atop his beloved Harley-Davidson. Standley first came up with the idea 18 years ago and, with the help of his family, worked on it on and off for years. The casket was made out of plexiglass, with wood and steel rods reinforcing its bottom. "If you stopped by his house, he showed you his casket," his son Roy Standley told the Dayton Daily News. "He was proud of it." Dave and Tammy Vernon, co-owners of a funeral home, were tasked with the embalming process. "We've done personalization… but nothing this extreme," Tammy Vernon said. From the Dayton Daily News: Five embalmers prepared his body and secured him with a metal back brace and straps to ensure he'd never lose his seat on his beloved bike, even as it was towed by a trailer to his final resting place. The casket was assembled in the garage of Vernon's' funeral home in Mechanicsburg, enshrining him with his trophies and well-worn leathers. Along with his friends and family, motorcyclists from across the country reportedly rode along with his funeral procession through Mechanicsburg, Ohio. "He'd done right by us all these years, and at least we could see he goes out the way he wanted to," his son Pete Standley said.

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webmaster added a photo to Stream Photos album in Fallen Bikers Memorial Page group 11 months ago

webmaster posted a new discussion1 year ago

Motorcycle Crashes Far More Deadly Than Car Crashes

Nov. 20, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. Motorcycle Crashes Far More Deadly Than Car Crashes By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter (HEALTHDAY) MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Motorcycle crashes are far costlier than car accidents, both in lives lost and in medical expenses, a new study shows. Canadian researchers found that the death rate from motorcycle crashes was five times greater than from car crashes, and the rate of severe injury was 10 times greater. That came with a six times greater cost to the health care system. Though the findings stem from an analysis of traffic accidents in the Canadian province of Ontario, the researchers said that similar patterns would likely be seen elsewhere. One reason: Motorcycles are inherently more risky because motorcycles lack the protections that cars provide. "It's clear that it's much more dangerous to ride a motorcycle than to ride in a car," said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Pincus. But the study isn't saying that motorcycles should be taken off the road. "A lot of people enjoy riding motorcycles, so we're not saying the answer is to ban them from doing it," said Pincus, who's with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, in Toronto. Riding simply should be made safer, he said. Kara Macek, a spokesperson for the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), agreed. Universal helmet laws are one way, she said. In the United States, only about half of states require helmets for all motorcyclists, according to the GHSA. "Just telling people to wear helmets is not enough," Macek said. "You really need the strength of the law behind it." Alcohol is another issue. Of all U.S. motorcyclists killed in accidents in 2015, 27 percent were intoxicated, according to the GHSA. Riders can take some straightforward steps to lower their risks: "Wear a helmet, obey speed limits and don't use alcohol," Macek said. "But," she added, "that's not to say the technology -- the vehicle itself -- can't be improved." Car safety has improved greatly over the years, Macek noted -- with seatbelts, airbags and greater structural integrity now giving passengers far more protection than decades ago. The nature of riding a motorcycle, or a bike, means that people are more vulnerable in a collision, she said, but certain safety measures -- like anti-lock brake systems -- are possible. Macek also agreed that the patterns found in this study would turn up elsewhere. In fact, according to the GHSA, U.S. data show that for every mile driven, motorcycles have a death rate that's 26 times higher than that of passenger vehicles. The findings, published Nov. 20 in the journal CMAJ, were based on data from more than 300,000 Ontario adults who were hospitalized after a car or motorcycle accident from 2007 to 2013. Overall, the researchers found, the death rate was nearly five times higher among motorcyclists: Each year, there were 14 deaths for every 100,000 registered motorcycles in the province, versus three deaths for every 100,000 registered cars. Similarly, people in motorcycle accidents sustained 10 times as many severe injuries -- with a yearly rate of 125 per 100,000 motorcycles, versus 12 for every 100,000 cars. As for related medical costs, motorcycle accidents resulted, on average, in almost double the cost that resulted from car accidents. Factoring in the rates of injury, the researchers estimated that each motorcycle registered in Ontario costs the health care system six times more than each registered car. The human toll is the primary concern, according to Pincus. "Some of us who worked on this study have experience treating motorcycle accident patients, and we've seen some bad injuries," he said. However, highlighting the health care costs, he noted, might offer some added motivation to improve motorcycle safety. More information The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has more on motorcycle safety. Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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webmaster posted a new discussion1 year ago

Top 10 Motorcycle Safety Tips for Street Riding

Top 10 Motorcycle Safety Tips We’ve all heard it – “there are only two kinds of riders, those who have crashed and those who are going to.” On an average day, about 222 motorcycle crashes occur in the U.S. About 184 of those cause injury, with 10 of those being fatal – a very scary statistic. No matter where you ride or what you ride, staying safe is the top priority. Since starting my motorcycling days 40 years ago aboard a brand new 1974 Honda CL200T, I’ve made some observations and learned some things that have helped me stay safe. There are, of course, literally hundreds of street safety tactics and strategies and many may be unique to the kind of riding you do. There are some that I’ve found very useful and a number of them apply to whatever motorcycle riding you do—competition types excluded, of course. Here are my Top-10 Street Riding Survival Tips — feel free to add your own in the comment section below! 1. No drugs, no alcohol when riding. If you take prescription drugs know whether the medication has known side effects such as slowed reaction times, dizziness, drowsiness and so on. This can be particularly important if the dosage of any medication you regularly take is changed or other medications are added or stopped. Medications for high blood pressure, diabetes, depression, smoking cessation and some other conditions can be particularly prone to having side effects you should know about before you ride. Talk to your doctor about your medications and conditions and how safe riding may be affected. 2. ATGATT. Protect yourself and any passenger by using All The Gear All The Time. If you ride in a state where helmet use is up to you, choose to wear a helmet. Head injuries can be very serious, even if they occur at low speeds without a helmet. Helmets cannot prevent head injuries in all instances, but there’s little question that they can reduce severity of head injuries or prevent them altogether in a variety of circumstances. If they weren’t effective, would professional racers of all types use them? Modern riding jackets are tough, can be armored up, made with high visibility fluorescent and/or reflective materials and can be lightweight and ventilated or made of mesh to be cool in warm weather. Riding gloves, purpose-built riding pants, boots and eye protection can combine to offer great protection from head to foot with comfort in most all riding conditions. 3. Situational awareness. Keep your head on a swivel and use the rear-view mirrors to monitor what’s going on 360° around you. Try to keep space between you and other traffic; don’t be a tailgater and don’t let other drivers tailgate you. The more space you keep between you and the other guy, the less likely it is their mistake will involve you. Situational awareness can help you anticipate problems and avoid them. 4. Speed reduces your options. Every time your speed doubles, your stopping distance roughly quadruples. So, if you can stop in 50 feet from 30 mph, for example, at 60 mph, your stopping distance goes up to about 200 feet. It’s not just about obeying the speed limit—it’s about giving yourself more options for stopping and evasive action that can be done safely. Think about dropping down below the speed limit in some situations such as wet pavement, poor visibility, ground cover such as brush or crops tall enough to conceal wildlife that comes right up to the pavement as is the case on some back roads. Forget about street racing—if you want to twist the throttle for real, take out to a track for a track day or sanctioned event. 5. Be able to count on your machine. That means a quick pre-ride check on tires, attachments, oil, coolant (if applicable), brake fluid, chain or drive belt condition and tension, lights, brake light, turn signal and horn function. Anything not working properly, loose, out of adjustment, low fluid levels and so on can cause unexpected problems while under way and some things can affect control of the bike. 6. Think about special hazards that can come up in certain times of the year. If you ride out in farm country, standing crops like corn can conceal moving hazards such as deer, bear even wild turkey and dogs that are big enough to take a bike down in a collision. Be particularly cautious during late summer and early fall riding when harvesting and hunting seasons are underway. Farm equipment like corn harvesters can spook deer and other animals that may be feeding or bedded down in the crops. When that happens, the animals may bolt out into the road, creating a very special type of hazard requiring special tactics, especially in areas where crop planting is allowed to crowd close to the roadway. Cut your speed, cover your brake, stay out near the centerline and watch for any sign of movement along the roadside. 7. Heighten your vision. A lot of riders wear dark wrap-around glasses, which work fine in bright sunlight in areas where deep shadows are infrequent. However, if your route includes a lot of areas of dark shadows at the roadside, such as in forested areas, you may want to consider lightly tinted eyewear. If there is a lot of shadow or the day is going to be overcast, certain types of amber riding glasses or face shield may be helpful in increasing contrast. 8. Know the road and if you don’t, know your limits. It can be fun to get frisky with the throttle on roads you know well, especially if they have some neat technical curves and have good road surfaces. When you’re traveling in unfamiliar country, take it easy. The next blind corner may be concealing gravel or sand on the road, an off-camber, decreasing radius corner or a one-lane bridge—with a gravel truck taking up all of it. 9. Consider training. Whether you’re a rider with some experience, a former rider who has been away from the sport for some years and are now returning or are a new motorcycle owner, joining the ranks of riders for the first time, professionally delivered training can make you a better rider. Major motorcycle manufacturers offer great rider training programs around the country such as Harley-Davidson’s Rider’s Edge Program with programs for new riders and experienced riders alike. Honda has MSF basic and advanced rider training, as well. 10. Focus. Perhaps nothing is more central to safety than the rider’s focus on the task at hand. Avoid allowing anything to intrude on your attention to the road, your speed, changes in road conditions, weather, traffic and roadside hazards and other vehicles. One of the major causes of motorcycle accidents identified in the landmark Hurt report on motorcycle crashes was when other drivers (i.e. automobile drivers) said they didn’t see the motorcyclist. That means the motorcyclist has two countermeasures—increase your visibility to other drivers (see point #2)—and make sure you see them in case they don’t see you. These are just a few ideas, no doubt you are aware of many more. Nothing in this article should be construed as legal or medical advice—just some good ideas to help out with safety. Take your time, enjoy the ride and be safe out there! Reference: “2003 Motor Vehicle Crash Data from FARS and GES,” National Center for Statistics and Analysis, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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webmaster posted a new discussion1 year ago

Motorcycle Fatality Facts - Insurance Institute for...

Motorcycles and ATVs | 2015 2015 ALL FATALITY FACTS TOPICS Motorcycles are less stable and less visible than cars and often have high performance capabilities. When motorcycles crash, their riders lack the protection of an enclosed vehicle, so they're more likely to be injured or killed. The federal government estimates that per mile traveled in 2014, the number of deaths on motorcycles was over 27 times the number in cars. 1 Because serious head injury is common among fatally injured motorcyclists, helmet use is important. Helmets are about 37 percent effective in preventing motorcycle deaths 2 and about 67 percent effective in preventing brain injuries. 3 Yet only 19 states and the District of Columbia mandate helmet use by all riders. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are not designed for on-highway use, but in recent years more than 300 riders died in crashes on public roads annually. The following facts are based on analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). Posted November 2016. Data subsections: Trends Age and gender Helmet use Motorcycle type and engine size When and where they died Alcohol involvement ATVs Trends A total of 4,693 motorcyclists died in crashes in 2015. Motorcyclist deaths had been declining since the early 1980s but began to increase in 1998 and continued to increase through 2008. Motorcycle deaths accounted for 13 percent of all motor vehicle crash deaths in 2015 and were more than double the number of motorcyclist deaths in 1997. Passenger vehicle occupant deaths and motorcyclist deaths, 1975-2015 Passenger vehicle occupant deaths Motorcyclist deaths 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 Passenger vehicle occupant and motorcyclist deaths as a percentage of all motor vehicle crash deaths, 1975-2015 Year Passenger vehicle occupant deaths Motorcyclist deaths All motor vehicle deaths Number % Number % Number % 1975 30,601 69 3,106 7 44,525 100 1976 31,724 70 3,232 7 45,523 100 1977 32,823 69 4,004 8 47,878 100 1978 34,923 69 4,448 9 50,331 100 1979 35,026 69 4,712 9 51,093 100 1980 34,996 68 4,955 10 51,091 100 1981 33,711 68 4,737 10 49,301 100 1982 29,656 67 4,267 10 43,945 100 1983 29,154 68 4,099 10 42,589 100 1984 30,094 68 4,425 10 44,257 100 1985 29,848 68 4,415 10 43,825 100 1986 32,224 70 4,309 9 46,087 100 1987 33,145 71 3,832 8 46,390 100 1988 34,105 72 3,491 7 47,087 100 1989 33,599 74 3,030 7 45,582 100 1990 32,711 73 3,128 7 44,599 100 1991 30,810 74 2,702 7 41,508 100 1992 29,457 75 2,291 6 39,250 100 1993 29,994 75 2,346 6 40,150 100 1994 30,820 76 2,215 5 40,716 100 1995 31,914 76 2,138 5 41,817 100 1996 32,354 77 2,077 5 42,065 100 1997 32,343 77 2,056 5 42,013 100 1998 31,781 77 2,227 5 41,501 100 1999 32,008 77 2,419 6 41,717 100 2000 32,109 77 2,829 7 41,945 100 2001 31,938 76 3,123 7 42,196 100 2002 32,724 76 3,187 7 43,005 100 2003 32,166 75 3,641 8 42,884 100 2004 31,750 74 3,904 9 42,836 100 2005 31,455 72 4,460 10 43,510 100 2006 30,628 72 4,699 11 42,708 100 2007 29,155 71 5,050 12 41,259 100 2008 25,547 68 5,112 14 37,423 100 2009 23,507 69 4,286 13 33,883 100 2010 22,351 68 4,324 13 32,999 100 2011 21,413 66 4,403 14 32,479 100 2012 21,906 65 4,695 14 33,782 100 2013 21,361 65 4,402 13 32,894 100 2014 21,131 65 4,302 13 32,744 100 2015 22,543 64 4,693 13 35,092 100 In 2015, 27 percent of fatally injured motorcycle drivers were operating without a valid driver's license. The rate of unlicensed fatally injured motorcycle drivers during 2015 was higher than the rate of unlicensed fatally injured passenger vehicle drivers (27 percent vs. 15 percent). Passenger vehicle and motorcycle driver deaths by driver's license status, 2004-2015 Year Passenger vehicle drivers Motorcycle drivers No valid license Valid license Total* No valid license Valid license Total* Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % 2006 3,423 16 17,941 83 21,592 100 1,134 26 3,219 73 4,387 100 2007 3,206 16 17,142 83 20,542 100 1,239 26 3,461 73 4,740 100 2008 2,702 15 15,399 84 18,266 100 1,190 25 3,561 74 4,782 100 2009 2,407 14 14,294 85 16,834 100 886 22 3,077 77 3,987 100 2010 2,273 14 13,672 85 16,029 100 874 22 3,127 78 4,022 100 2011 2,254 14 13,225 85 15,561 100 891 22 3,210 78 4,120 100 2012 2,366 15 13,464 85 15,915 100 1,049 24 3,296 75 4,381 100 2013 2,319 15 13,174 85 15,577 100 1,058 26 3,060 74 4,147 100 2014 2,512 16 12,879 83 15,495 100 1,116 28 2,900 72 4,041 100 2015 2,543 15 13,811 84 16,484 100 1,196 27 3,183 72 4,415 100 *Total includes other and/or unknowns Forty-one percent of motorcyclist deaths in 2015 occurred in single-vehicle crashes, and 59 percent occurred in multiple-vehicle crashes. This has remained largely unchanged since the 1980s. Motorcyclist deaths by crash type, 1975-2015 Year Single-vehicle Multiple-vehicle All crashes* Deaths % Deaths % Deaths % 1975 1,137 37 1,963 63 3,106 100 1976 1,235 38 1,981 61 3,232 100 1977 1,564 39 2,424 61 4,004 100 1978 1,701 38 2,726 61 4,448 100 1979 1,888 40 2,811 60 4,712 100 1980 2,034 41 2,897 58 4,955 100 1981 1,926 41 2,789 59 4,737 100 1982 1,804 42 2,463 58 4,267 100 1983 1,787 44 2,312 56 4,099 100 1984 1,879 42 2,546 58 4,425 100 1985 1,889 43 2,526 57 4,415 100 1986 1,835 43 2,474 57 4,309 100 1987 1,603 42 2,229 58 3,832 100 1988 1,466 42 2,025 58 3,491 100 1989 1,348 44 1,682 56 3,030 100 1990 1,380 44 1,748 56 3,128 100 1991 1,215 45 1,487 55 2,702 100 1992 1,054 46 1,237 54 2,291 100 1993 997 42 1,349 58 2,346 100 1994 951 43 1,264 57 2,215 100 1995 900 42 1,238 58 2,138 100 1996 881 42 1,196 58 2,077 100 1997 882 43 1,174 57 2,056 100 1998 993 45 1,234 55 2,227 100 1999 1,084 45 1,335 55 2,419 100 2000 1,253 44 1,576 56 2,829 100 2001 1,402 45 1,721 55 3,123 100 2002 1,475 46 1,712 54 3,187 100 2003 1,555 43 2,086 57 3,641 100 2004 1,718 44 2,186 56 3,904 100 2005 1,940 43 2,515 56 4,460 100 2006 2,049 44 2,644 56 4,699 100 2007 2,224 44 2,824 56 5,050 100 2008 2,331 46 2,777 54 5,112 100 2009 1,920 45 2,364 55 4,286 100 2010 1,958 45 2,366 55 4,324 100 2011 2,010 46 2,393 54 4,403 100 2012 2,029 43 2,666 57 4,695 100 2013 1,835 42 2,567 58 4,402 100 2014 1,799 42 2,503 58 4,302 100 2015 1,906 41 2,787 59 4,693 100 *Total includes other and/or unknowns Age and gender In the early 1980s the proportion of fatally injured motorcyclists who were 50 and older started to increase, rising from 3 percent of all rider deaths in 1982 to 13 percent in 1997 and 35 percent in 2015. In contrast, 30 percent of the fatally injured motorcyclists in 2015 were younger than 30, compared with 80 percent in 1975. Percentage of motorcyclist deaths by age, 1975-2015 ≤29 years 30-39 years 40-49 years ≥50 years 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Motorcyclist deaths by age, 1975-2015 Year ≤29 years 30-39 years 40-49 years ≥50 years Total* Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % 1975 2,475 80 419 13 129 4 79 3 3,106 100 1976 2,565 79 426 13 142 4 97 3 3,232 100 1977 3,211 80 529 13 147 4 112 3 4,004 100 1978 3,557 80 603 14 177 4 104 2 4,448 100 1979 3,627 77 729 15 212 4 138 3 4,712 100 1980 3,641 73 896 18 265 5 149 3 4,955 100 1981 3,487 74 840 18 255 5 146 3 4,737 100 1982 3,082 72 790 19 247 6 138 3 4,267 100 1983 2,959 72 765 19 234 6 135 3 4,099 100 1984 3,171 72 813 18 263 6 165 4 4,425 100 1985 3,160 72 849 19 238 5 163 4 4,415 100 1986 3,034 70 877 20 257 6 131 3 4,309 100 1987 2,588 68 831 22 275 7 138 4 3,832 100 1988 2,309 66 757 22 278 8 146 4 3,491 100 1989 1,873 62 735 24 283 9 136 4 3,030 100 1990 1,885 60 805 26 265 8 173 6 3,128 100 1991 1,580 58 711 26 283 10 127 5 2,702 100 1992 1,242 54 638 28 268 12 143 6 2,291 100 1993 1,229 52 647 28 324 14 145 6 2,346 100 1994 1,121 51 584 26 338 15 171 8 2,215 100 1995 1,057 49 562 26 347 16 172 8 2,138 100 1996 932 45 541 26 408 20 196 9 2,077 100 1997 837 41 547 27 396 19 276 13 2,056 100 1998 897 40 599 27 465 21 265 12 2,227 100 1999 878 36 601 25 564 23 376 16 2,419 100 2000 986 35 696 25 666 24 476 17 2,829 100 2001 1,108 35 789 25 715 23 509 16 3,123 100 2002 1,022 32 767 24 758 24 638 20 3,187 100 2003 1,161 32 829 23 887 24 763 21 3,641 100 2004 1,256 32 853 22 946 24 849 22 3,904 100 2005 1,405 32 963 22 1,003 22 1,088 24 4,460 100 2006 1,495 32 984 21 1,085 23 1,134 24 4,699 100 2007 1,547 31 1,033 20 1,148 23 1,317 26 5,050 100 2008 1,580 31 964 19 1,135 22 1,431 28 5,112 100 2009 1,139 27 830 19 983 23 1,332 31 4,286 100 2010 1,121 26 787 18 968 22 1,447 33 4,324 100 2011 1,177 27 800 18 888 20 1,537 35 4,403 100 2012 1,219 26 883 19 930 20 1,662 35 4,695 100 2013 1,206 27 774 18 907 21 1,515 34 4,402 100 2014 1,276 30 725 17 747 17 1,553 36 4,302 100 2015 1,387 30 809 17 834 18 1,661 35 4,693 100 *Total includes other and/or unknowns Ninety-one percent of motorcyclists killed in 2015 were males. Motorcyclist deaths by age and gender, 2015 Age Male Female Total* Number % Number % Number % 16 6 60 4 40 10 100 16-19 118 90 13 10 131 100 20-24 578 94 39 6 618 100 25-29 579 92 49 8 628 100 30-34 393 93 30 7 423 100 35-39 352 91 34 9 386 100 40-44 334 88 46 12 380 100 45-49 399 88 55 12 454 100 50-54 445 87 68 13 513 100 55-59 432 89 52 11 484 100 60-69 482 93 39 7 521 100 ≥70 139 97 4 3 143 100 Total* 4,259 91 433 9 4,693 100 *Total includes other and/or unknowns Sixty-one percent of the female motorcyclists who died in crashes in 2015 were passengers, and their deaths represented 95 percent of the passenger deaths. The vast majority of male motorcyclists who died were drivers. Motorcyclist deaths by person type and gender, 2015 Person type Male Female Number % Number % Driver 4,244 100 170 39 Passenger 13 1 262 61 Total* 4,259 100 433 100 *Total includes other and/or unknowns Helmet use In 2015, 61 percent of fatally injured motorcycle drivers were helmeted. Helmet use was lower, at 47 percent, for people killed as passengers on motorcycles. Helmet use of fatally injured motorcycle drivers and passengers, 2015 Helmet No...

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